mentorship + conversation

As part of my journey into integrative psychotherapy (the entheotropic or holosophic adventure), I contacted a man called David, a friend of a friend I met through Buddhism. I asked him to be my mentor (because I thought he was a practising therapist), and we have started a conversation that has already gone, for me at least, next-level, transcendental.

(In our first conversation we talked about how he’s not a practising therapist, which launched us into the question of whether it is even actually beneficial to work with clients as therapists, especially if there is a power-dynamic established by one being paid by the other ~ we talked about narcissistic wounding and transference.)

We are going to explore our conversation publically, here at Entheotropia.

This question about the efficacy of therapists ~ it’s a fascinating one, and very good ground for a mentor–protege relationship such as this, because it’s important that I think about why I’m doing the Bachelor and what I hope to emerge as once I’m finished.

I’m really not sure whether I want to emerge as a therapist. I’m doing this first and foremost to learn about and integrate my own experience with mental ‘illness’ and spiritual emergency. It’s far too early for me to say with any conviction that I do or don’t want to emerge as a therapist.

The other day when I was invited to a Chakradance class by Giselle, I was just about to lay down for a pranayama session and the whole session was riddled with thoughts about something I later wrote down as Prana+Pulse … people laying in a room, blindfolded, specific-frequency music, and a series of guided pranayama exercises to balance the life essence … or to engage/disengage the parasympathetic/sympathetic nervous system, whichever might be required … that’s the kind of thing I imagine doing, along with writing about the whole thing and sharing the knowledge.

I’m interested in sitting down one-on-one with clients (I play that role frequently in my relationships already), but I’m not sure it’s the most efficient or even the most effective way of helping people ~ I imagine referring clients to such things as Chakradance or Prana+Pulse, or helping them to access the community services (such as housing support) they need to establish the baseline of Maslow’s hierarchy, but I certainly don’t imagine solving anyone’s problems directly.

Okay, sometimes I do ~ but I hope that will begin to fall away as I continue working on myself over the next three years while I pursue this bachelor. (My messiah complex was hopefully parsed and transcended in Jan 2017.)

Anyway ^ tangent! ^

To say I’m excited about this relationship with David would be a gross understatement. In just two conversations we have covered a lot of ground already, and David has introduced me to ideas that I have been yearning to encounter for a very long time. Things like:

  • narcissistic wounding
    ~ what is it?
    ~ how to defend oneself against it?
    ~ is it related to transference?
  • transference
    ~ what is it?
    ~ how to defend oneself against it?
  • consciousness
    ~ is it the primary substance of the universe?
    ~ or is it an illusion?
    ~ evolution of consciousness
  • my goals
    ~ what they are?
    ~ can you support them?
    ~ will supporting those goals beneft your own goals?

I will break these down into individual posts ~ in the spirit of wabi sabi, this post and those posts will be eternally half-finished, as are all good conversations.

psychosis ~ the dragon on the hero’s journey

Jung, on the subject of integrating psychosis:

The reason why the involvement looks very like a psychosis is that the patient is integrating the same fantasy-material to which the insane person falls victim because he cannot integrate it but is swallowed up by it.

In myths the hero is the one who conquers the dragon, not the one who is devoured by it.

And yet both have to deal with the same dragon.

Also, he is no hero who never met the dragon, or who, if he once saw it, declared afterwards that he saw nothing. Equally, only one who has risked the fight with the dragon and is not overcome by it wins the hoard, the “treasure hard to attain.”

He alone has a genuine claim to self-confidence, for he has faced the dark ground of his self and thereby has gained himself.

This experience gives him faith and trust, the pistis [the faith] in the ability of the Self to sustain him, for everything that menaced him from inside he has made his own.

He has acquired the right to believe that he will be able to overcome all future threats by the same means.

He has arrived at an inner certainty which makes him capable of self-reliance, and attained what the alchemists called the unio mentalis.

~ Carl Jung, CW14, Para 756

integrative psychotherapy + Vedic destiny

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but what we make?

In a twist of what Vedic philosophy might describe as destiny (involving a Kafka-esque turnaround in the Australian welfare system), I find myself now pursuing a Bachelor of Integrative Psychotherapy at IKON Institute, a dinky-di and very cute, progressive and holistic private university near the Valley in Brisvedas. (I was told by one person at Centrelink that the Bachelor was not supported by Austudy, and then, when I called again, I was told that it was.)

Integrative psychotherapy “is the process of making whole”, and the Canadian Institute for Integrative Psychotherapy describes it further:

Integrative Psychotherapy embraces an attitude towards the practice of psychotherapy that affirms the inherent value of each individual. It is a unifying psychotherapy that responds appropriately and effectively to the person at the affective, behavioral, cognitive, and physiological levels of functioning, and addresses as well the spiritual dimension of life.

The term “integrative” of Integrative Psychotherapy has a number of meanings. It refers to the process of integrating the personality: taking disowned, unaware, or unresolved aspects of the self and making them part of a cohesive personality, reducing the use of defense mechanisms that inhibit spontaneity and limit flexibility in problem solving, health maintenance, and relating to people, and re-engaging the world with full contact. It is the process of making whole. Through integration, it becomes possible for people to face each moment openly and freshly without the protection of a pre-formed opinion, position, attitude, or expectation.

This bachelor is the perfect coalescence of all that I’ve been wondering about for a very long time, and I feel extra-ordinarly fortunate and grateful that I have this opportunity to pursue my own wholeness so that I might be able to help others do the same.

Integrative psychotherapy is basically the entheotropic process, or the holosophic process ~ the process of realising wholeness through experiential wisdom of our being a part of the whole, as a water droplet is an integral part of the ocean.

In the Bhagavad-gita it is said that each living entity is qualitatively the same as Krsna (the Supreme Personality of the Godhead), and the only difference between the living entity and Krsna is a quantitative distinction, as the water droplet is qualitatively, but not quantitatively, the ocean.

What Osho described as oceanic consciousness may be the same as fully realised Krsna conscious … but I’m not sure. I’m not sure how I feel about the Gita just now, except that I enjoy how it’s giving me a broader context in which to place Buddhism, which was my go-to source of spiritual succour for nearly a decade. In this sense, Vedic philosophy is a container that is even more broad and encompassing than Buddhism or Christianity or Islam or Judaism or any of the other religions that might have grown from Vedic philosophy.

I have to stop here now, lest I enter a rabbit hole I cannot escape from. The only other thing I would add is I am excited to be learning that maybe Gautama was an avatar of Krsna, and that there is almost certainly a cultural link between the likes of Gautama and Jesus.

I know that’s a can of worms … but I’m a boy!, so I love eating worms 😀